How to Use Average True Range (ATR)?

8 minutes read

The Average True Range (ATR) is a technical analysis indicator that measures volatility in the market. Unlike other indicators that focus on price movement or trend direction, the ATR specifically focuses on the level of volatility or the range of price movement.


To use the Average True Range effectively, you can follow the steps mentioned below:

  1. Calculate the True Range: The True Range is the difference between the current high and low prices or the difference between the current high and the previous close, whichever is greater. Take the absolute value of each close-to-close price change.
  2. Apply a smoothing technique: To smoothen out the True Range, you can use a moving average. The most common smoothing period is 14 days, but you can adjust it to your preference or trading strategy.
  3. Interpret the ATR values: The ATR values generally indicate the level of volatility in the market. Higher ATR values indicate increased volatility, while lower values indicate decreased volatility.
  4. Use ATR for stop-loss and profit-target placement: As ATR reflects volatility levels, it can be useful in determining suitable stop-loss and profit-target levels. For example, you may choose to set wider stop-loss levels during high volatility periods, considering larger price swings.
  5. Compare ATR to identify divergences or confirm trends: You can use ATR to compare volatility between different securities or different timeframes. If there is a divergence where an asset's price is increasing while its ATR is decreasing, it could indicate a weakening trend. In contrast, if both the price and ATR are increasing, it may suggest a strengthening trend.
  6. Combine ATR with other indicators: ATR can be used in conjunction with other technical indicators to enhance your trading decisions. For example, you can use it along with the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) or Bollinger Bands to get a comprehensive view of market trends and volatility.


Remember, the ATR is not a standalone indicator for predicting price direction; rather, it helps you gauge the market's volatility or potential price range. It is essential to combine it with other analysis techniques and indicators to make informed trading decisions.

Best Free Stock Chart Websites in 2024

1
FinViz

Rating is 5 out of 5

FinViz

2
TradingView

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

TradingView

3
FinQuota

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

FinQuota

4
Yahoo Finance

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

Yahoo Finance


What is the recommended time period for calculating Average True Range (ATR)?

The recommended time period for calculating Average True Range (ATR) is typically 14 periods. This is the most commonly used parameter for ATR, but it can be adjusted based on individual preferences and the specific market being analyzed.


What are the different ways to plot Average True Range (ATR) on a chart?

There are several different ways to plot Average True Range (ATR) on a chart. Here are a few common ways:

  1. Line Chart: The ATR can be plotted as a line chart on its own, typically placed beneath the price chart. This allows traders to observe the fluctuations and volatility levels over time.
  2. Overlay: Some traders prefer to overlay the ATR directly on the price chart. This is done by adding a separate line to the price chart that represents the ATR values. The line can be colored differently, making it visually distinguishable from the price line.
  3. Histogram: Another way to plot the ATR is by representing it as a histogram. This is done by subtracting the ATR values from the high or low prices and plotting the results as vertical bars. The height of the bars represents the ATR, with taller bars indicating higher volatility.
  4. Moving Average: The ATR can also be plotted as a moving average. This is done by calculating the moving average of the ATR values over a specific period. The moving average line can then be plotted on the chart to provide a smoothed view of the volatility.


It's worth noting that the specific method of plotting ATR may vary depending on the charting software or platform being used. Traders often experiment with different methods to find the one that suits their trading style and preferences.


How does Average True Range (ATR) differ from other volatility indicators?

Average True Range (ATR) differs from other volatility indicators in several ways:

  1. Calculation: ATR measures volatility based on the true range, which is the greatest of the following: the current high minus the current low, the absolute value of the current high minus the previous close, or the absolute value of the current low minus the previous close. Other volatility indicators may use different calculations, such as measuring standard deviations from moving averages.
  2. Time Period: ATR provides a measure of volatility over a specific time period, typically 14 days. Other volatility indicators may have different time periods or may be based on shorter time frames, such as hourly or daily data.
  3. Absolute Value: ATR represents volatility as an absolute value, providing a measure of the price range regardless of the direction of movement. Some other volatility indicators may quantify volatility as a percentage or a standardized value, which can be helpful for comparing volatility across different securities or time periods.
  4. Application: ATR is commonly used in technical analysis to determine stop-loss levels or to set price targets. Other volatility indicators may serve different purposes, such as identifying overbought or oversold levels, confirming trend reversals, or generating trading signals.


Overall, ATR provides a specific measure of price volatility by considering the true range, using a particular time period, and representing volatility as an absolute value. Other volatility indicators may have different calculations, time frames, measures, or applications.


What is the difference between Average True Range (ATR) and standard deviation?

The Average True Range (ATR) and standard deviation are both measures used to quantify volatility, but there are some key differences between them:

  1. Calculation Methods: ATR: The ATR is computed based on the average range of price movements over a specified period. It takes into account the true range, which is the greatest of the following: (a) the difference between the current high and low price, (b) the difference between the previous closing price and the current high price, or (c) the difference between the previous closing price and the current low price. Standard Deviation: The standard deviation measures the dispersion or variability of a dataset from its mean. It calculates the average squared deviation from the mean and then takes the square root to give the standard deviation.
  2. Interpretation: ATR: The ATR is primarily used to assess and gauge an asset's volatility. Traders and investors often utilize it to determine appropriate stop-loss and take-profit levels, as well as position sizing. Standard Deviation: The standard deviation is more widely used in statistical analysis and indicates the spread or dispersion of the data points around the mean. It helps to identify the range within which most data points fall and can be used to analyze risk or measure performance in finance.
  3. Units of Measurement: ATR: The ATR is measured in the same unit as the price, such as dollars, points, or pips. Standard Deviation: The standard deviation is measured in the same unit as the data being analyzed, such as percentage, dollars, or any other relevant measurement.
  4. Time Considerations: ATR: The ATR considers a specific time period, typically days or weeks, to calculate the average range and assess volatility over that period. Standard Deviation: The standard deviation can be calculated using data from any time frame, whether it's daily, weekly, monthly, or any other interval.


Overall, while both ATR and standard deviation measure volatility, the ATR is specifically tailored to capture price range movements, particularly for making trading decisions, while standard deviation has a broader statistical usage across various fields.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Telegram Whatsapp

Related Posts:

Average True Range (ATR) is a technical indicator utilized in day trading to measure market volatility. It assists traders in determining the potential profit or loss that can be expected in a particular trading session or period. To effectively use ATR in day...
The Average True Range (ATR) is a popular technical indicator used in trading to measure and gauge market volatility. Developed by J. Welles Wilder Jr. in 1978, it helps traders assess the potential range of price movements for a given financial instrument. AT...
The Triple Exponential Average (TRIX) is a technical analysis indicator that helps investors and traders identify trend reversals and determine potential trading opportunities. It is based on the calculation of an exponentially smoothed moving average of an ex...
In Hadoop, finding the average can be achieved using MapReduce, which is a programming model for processing large data sets in parallel.To calculate the average in Hadoop, you can follow these steps:Map Phase: In this phase, the input data is divided into smal...
The Simple Moving Average (SMA) is a commonly used technical indicator in financial analysis. It is used to analyze the price trends of various securities such as stocks, commodities, or currencies. The SMA is calculated by taking the average of a specified nu...
Triple Exponential Average (TRIX) is a technical indicator commonly used in swing trading. It belongs to the family of oscillators and is used to identify trends and potential reversal points in the price movement of a security.The TRIX is calculated by applyi...